Friday, March 05, 2010

My Turn With the Memories

On Sunday, we meet with the estate sale people to sign a contract to officially have a sale. In preparation for that, Ed has spent most of the time not working for his employer working in the garage at the house that is soon to be our home.

I've mentioned here that it is mind boggling the stuff that was packed and moved here. His mom could have easily served drinks to the entire population of their town on Long Island in real glasses, without resorting to Dixie or Solo cups. How do I know? Because there is one whole corner of a room filled with boxes of various drinking glasses. Large boxes. Heavy boxes, ones that no doubt the movers were chortling that they booked the move by WEIGHT of the contents of the truck.

Over the past few years, both Jane and Mom had said to Ed, there are boxes of your stuff in the pile over there. It was a floor to ceiling stack of probably about 70 boxes, most of the exterior were labeled "Nancy's stuff", so he didn't rush to get his stuff. Especially after the items he had specifically requested come to Florida (about $3000.00 in HO train tracks on a sheet of plywood) did not make the trip.

Yesterday, he went through everything and found three tiny boxes of essentially nothing of importance. Yeah, thanks for bringing my stuff. I can't help but feel for him, especially after sifting through crap and seeing more glassware than two people can use in a year and the contents of a deceased person's bedroom, unwashed clothing and all, was important enough to pack in its entirety and shove in a garage.

Today, I had a go at things. Mainly, my objective was to pull all paperwork, put it in a tub, so that the estate sale people didn't have to do it. I found stuff everywhere, all manner of things.

*Ed's father's birth certificate. Initially, I wondered how that was possible, because Ed the elder lost both his parents as an infant and the orphanage where he was raised burned down when he was an adult.

Then I saw the date on it: 1943. He must have gone into the Department of Vital Statistics in Manhattan and given them the appropriate information, and they hand wrote him a new one. (he was born in 1915) That would never happen today.

*A folder full of pictures, mostly of our two boys AND three pictures from our wedding. It was cool to see other people's candids and find all the studio shots tracking the boys through the years, but the pictures from the wedding? Those were a happy find. See, Ed and I put all our wedding funds towards having a nice reception for those who traveled from NY to see us exchange vows. The prices we were quoted for professional pictures were too high if we were going to serve a nice meal, too.

I'm hoping to find the original prints, because these were reprints from scanned pictures-and they were on some sort of textured paper. Once my laptop returns and I can scan images, they will be shared.

*All manner of paperwork from various Disney crap that litters the house. Yes, I am to the point that it is Disney CRAP, and those who know me well are probably surprised to see me put those two words together. I'll add this: Tinkerbell can suck it. There is so much JUNK with that wench all over it that I wish she would just be eaten by the alligator!

*I found wedding pictures for Ed's parents and a couple of pictures of his grandparents. What's cool to see is how much his mom was a doppleganger for her mom. Ed says he found photo albums he'd never seen before, ones from his dad's time in the military. It should be interesting to see what he looked like as a young man and see how close Ed looks to him.

Part of the effort to sift through paperwork was fruitful. I found that Jane purchased an extended warranty for the van that covers maintenance and repairs. She probably forgot she spent the money on it and paid out of pocket for stuff that was covered under it, if it is anything like the VW Masterguard plan I had.

I still need to find the owner's manual for the van AND the two electric scooters. It would figure that the paperwork for unimportant stuff is reverently saved, and the ones that are actually needed got pitched.

It looks to be a busy day tomorrow, working to cull the items to keep from the ones that bargain hunters will soon be going through.

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